Windermere to Coniston to The Three Lake Tour

 

Windermere to Coniston ,’ The Three Lake Tour’

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A 47 mile cycle route¬†which is for the ‘hardened cyclist’ It takes you from Windermere in

the heart of the lakes over the fells to Coniston Water and return via Estwaite Water. This
is a serious cycle ride with plenty of hills and descents, some of which are severe but with some fantastic scenery along the route. You can hire cycles in Windermere from Country Lanes Lake District, Windermere Railway Station, Station Precinct, Windermere.

Starting from The Windermere Steamboat Museum on Rayrigg Road on the lakeside cycle north along Rayrigg Road A592 along the banks of the lake and out of Windermere. After 1 mile you come to a roundabout where you take the first exit along Ambleside road A591 (B).

Continue along Ambleside Road as it takes you through the village of Troutbeck Bridge and down along the banks of Lake Windermere which is the largest lake in England. After 3 miles you reach the end of the lake where you TURN LEFT along Borrans Road A5095 (C). Cycle for about a quarter of a mile to the end of Borrans Road where you TURN LEFT on to the A593 towards Clappersgate (D).

After about 500 yards you reach Clappersgate where you TURN LEFT along the B5286 towards Pull Woods (E). Cycle for 1 mile up to Pull Woods and about 1 mile along the road from Clappersgate you TURN RIGHT up a small country lane (F) in the direction of Hawkshead Hill. Cycle up the steep hill for two and a half mile s where you reach the small hamlet of Hawkshead Hill. There is a pub about half way up the hill ‘The Drunken Duck’ should you wish to stop for refreshments.

At Hawkshead Hill (note at this point you are over 600ft above sea level) TURN RIGHT down Tran Howes (G) and follow the road as it twists and turns and starts to take you downhill. After 2 miles you come to a ‘T’ junction where you TURN RIGHT down Hawkshead Old Road B5285 (H).

Follow the road for 1 mile down in to the village of Coniston. Coniston is positioned on the banks of Coniston Water, England’s third largest lake. It was on this lake that Donald Campbell broke several world water speed records. In Coniston you will find The Ruskin Museum where Donald Campbell’s the fully restored Bluebird is on display.

When reach the centre of Coniston TURN LEFT along the A593 (I) towards Torver and cycle along the road for two and a half miles to Torver. At Torver TURN LEFT down the A5084 (J) opposite The Wilson Arms Pub.

Continue along the road as it takes you down along the banks of Lake Coniston through Sunny Bank to Water Yeat (K). At Water Yeat TURN LEFT along a country lane and after 300 yards you come to the end of the lane where you TURN LEFT (L). At this point you can enjoy the views and will be able to see across to ‘Coniston Old Man’.

Continue to cycle along the road which takes you back up along the opposite side of Lake Coniston after about 4 miles along the road you pass the historic house of Brantwood . Brantwood is a country house and has been the home of a number of prominent people, including John Ruskin. The house is open to the public.
Continue along the road and about 1 mile after Brantwood House follow the road to the right as you climb up a steep hill for about a mile. At the end of the lane you come to a ‘T’ junction (M) where you TURN RIGHT up High Cross and cycle up the very steep climb for about 200 yards. Once at the top of the hill you now relax and take a breather as you cycle down hill for half a mile to the end of the road where you TURN RIGHT (N) along the B5285 towards the village of Hawkshead.
Brantwood is a country house and has been the home of a number of prominent people, including John Ruskin. The house is open to the public.

After a few hundred yards you reach Hawkshead and you enter Hawkshead the B5285 bends sharply to the left you CARRY STRAIGHT ON ALONG MAIN STREET and past the Beatrix Potter Gallery. Hawkshead is where poet William Wordsworth was educated in its grammar school, and Beatrix Potter lived near the village.

Continue along the road as it takes you out of the village and you find yourself cycling along the banks of Esthwaite Water on your left hand side. Esthwaite Water is one of the smaller lakes in the lake district and the third lake of this cycle tour. It is well known for its fishing, especially for trout and pike. After about 2 miles near the end of the lake you TURN LEFT (O) along ht country lane which takes you round to Sawrey. Follow the road to Sawrey and at the junction TURN RIGHT along the B5285 (P) and follow the road as it takes you down to the bank of Lake Windermere.

At the bottom of the road you find yourself at the waters edge. At this point you can if you wish turn left and catch a ferry over to the other side of the lake near to Bowness and make your way back to the finish of the ride, but make sure you check the availability of the ferry. Or you can continue on the cycle ride along the whole route by TURNING RIGHT and following the road bearing left along the way keeping to the lakeside and passing through Cunsey, Grathwaite, Low Stott Park and after cycling about 7 miles along the lake just past the village of Lakeside you TURN LEFT over a bridge at the end of the lake (R) and then TURN LEFT along the A590 for 200 yards to Newby Bridge.

At Newbey Bridge TURN LEFT along the A592 (S) towards Storrs and Windermere. Continue to cycle along the road back up along the side of Lake Windermere passing through Storrs and the busy tourist town of Bowness and after 8 miles you arrive back at the Steamboat Museum at Windermere. The start/finish of your cycle ride. Windermere is a busy tourist town set on the lake. You will find all sorts of shops, bars and cafes to explore at the end of your long hard cycle ride.

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